China With Love - Letters from An American GI in World War II China and India by Lou Glist

 Click on cover image to purchase a copy

Click on cover image to purchase a copy

MWSA Review

Karl Boyd has done it again.  He has written a fiction that takes the reader on a journey down many roads, introducing many characters and opening many doors. The story unveils a plot that is world-wide, patient, and unique.  His characters are like all of us--both good and bad. The central figures grow and teach us a life lesson, but we have to wait until the very end to learn what it is.  From China with Love is a war of cultures fought with technology, but it is not bloodless. I recommend it, but it is not for the faint of heart.

Reviewed by: Mike Mullins (2009)


Author's Synopsis
If China is to survive, it must have more land for its millions of citizens. The Chairmen of the Chinese Republic tasks his ministers to formulate a ten-year plan to conquer all of Mexico, the U. S. A., and Canada, thereby turning the territory into "New China" while avoiding a horrific third world war.

Within twelve months, the strategy is finalized and the multi-pronged invasion of North America begins quietly. The devilishly clever operation is totally unobserved by the American public, their military and/or politicians, and their neighbors to the north and south.

The diversified main characters are two new mothers from Los Angeles, and their babies attempting to reach safety inland; a college student from Utah whose family has been wiped out; a police lieutenant from Sulfur Springs, Colorado, the only survivor on his shift and tasked with trying to save as many citizens as possible while awaiting the conquering forces; plus a young FBI agent whose father was killed in the attack.

As the few lucky survivors struggle with their new situations in life and deal with the invaders, along the way there is mystery, suspense, danger and romance, together with a terrible realization that perhaps the United States is soon to be a thing of the past.

As with all of Karl Boyd's novels, the ending is unexpected and decidedly disarming. You'll be tempted to turn to that last page, but please don't until you arrive there naturally. Why spoil a wonderful novel?