Remains of the Corps: A U.S. Marine Family History: Book I: Eagle

Remains of the Corps: A U.S. Marine Family History: Book I: Eagle

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Item Description

Will Remain is a fictional author. He is a third-generation Marine and a veteran of the war in Vietnam. He is writing a trilogy that will be the first multigenerational account of a Marine Corps family, chronicling his own family’s service and lives over a sixty-year period and through four wars. His work is titled The Remains of the Corps: A Marine Family History. Book I of the trilogy is titled Eagle, and Books II and III will be titled Globe and Anchor, respectively. Offered here for your consideration is the Prologue to and Chapter 1 of Eagle. Readers are encouraged to provide feedback on the material presented. In the Prologue (1,900 words), Will Remain provides, through excerpts from his personal journals, the back story on how he came to write The Remains of the Corps. In Chapter 1 (29,000 words), Will’s grandfather, Kenneth Remain, rises from the poverty of his youth to attend Harvard College where he befriends two people, the born to the purple Lawrence Blakeslee and Lawrence’s beautiful sweetheart, Kathleen Mulcahy, both of whom will greatly impact Kenneth’s life. Kenneth’s early story is told against the backdrop of historic Harvard College during the period 1913 to 1917, as war rages in Europe and Harvard students are heading off to the war by the hundreds, while America is still debating its role in the conflict. Since he was a youth, Kenneth has wanted to be a part of a great crusade. He has also long been enamored of the United States Marines and enlists as an officer in the Corps, triggering events that will have enormous repercussions on two families for generations to come.

Will Remain is a pseudonym for Tom Hebert, a second-generation Marine and a veteran of the war in Vietnam. Tom is also the author of Notes on Once An Eagle, a non-fiction work (cliff-notes style) on Anton Myrer’s classic novel Once An Eagle.

The Remains of the Corps has been in development for more than three years. Tom takes his writing very seriously. Prior to writing the novel’s first words, he completed comprehensive inventories of applicable vocabulary, clichés, and slang. He also studied literary devices, making significant use of alliteration, allusion, anagram, assonance/consonance, characterization, cliché, conflict, dialect, epigraph, flashback, foreshadowing, imagery, irony, personification, metaphor, mood, motif, repetition, quotation, setting, simile, style, vocabulary, and vocabulary of the period. He also employed: comic relief, euphemism, idiom, onomatopoeia, oxymoron, and symbolism. To ensure the authenticity of this work of historical fiction, he thoroughly researched Marine Corps history and, for the period encompassing the early 1900s, the cities and people of Boston, Worcester and Cambridge, as well as Harvard College.

The Remains of the Corps is dedicated “To every American, past and present, who claimed the title of United States Marine.”

KIRKUS REVIEWS

“[Kenneth Remain, a] starry-eyed college student who yearns to be a hero rushes headlong into World War I . . . In this first installment in a promised trilogy, fictional author “Will Remain” [USMC Vietnam veteran] is on a quest to pen an epic story of a Marine Corps family—and secure his own sanity . . . In a style reminiscent of F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author presents Harvard of the early 20th century as an oak-lined world of social clubs, stained-glass windows and marble plaques honoring alumni who died in battle. The superbly described setting serves to reinforce Kenneth’s desires, but the author also points out cracks in those ivied walls . . . Velvety description and devil-may-care dialogue paint the tale of a romantic young man eager to test himself amid the blood, mud and barbed wire of the Great War.”

Product Details

  • Author: Will Remain
  • Publication Date: 2011-10-05
  • Product Group: eBooks
  • Binding: Kindle Edition, 70 pages
  • ASIN: B005T5BVRM

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